Big Ten officials to assess bowl lineup

May 17, 2009
Iowa Coach Kirk Ferentz answers questions from the media during a press conference December 29, 2006 in San Antonio. Iowa and Texas played in the 2006 Alamo Bowl.

Iowa Coach Kirk Ferentz answers questions from the media during a press conference December 29, 2006 in San Antonio. Iowa and Texas played in the 2006 Alamo Bowl.

CHICAGO — The Big Ten’s future bowl lineup could receive a radical — or reserved — makeover this week when league officials, administrators and football coaches conduct their annual meetings.

Five of the league’s seven contracted bowls are up for renewal following the 2009 season. League officials plan to discuss each bowl this week, and Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany said the league will “explore the (bowl) landscape.”

“We keep in touch with our incumbents,” Delany said. “We really can’t engage in negotiations with others normally under most of the agreements until we engage in good faith negotiations with the incumbents. We can look around, chit chat, find out if there are others that might be interested, but we can’t engage in any sort of serious discussion on business issues until we go through the process with our own.”

The Big Ten has agreements with the Rose Bowl and the Insight Bowl (Phoenix area) until 2013. Bowls up for renewal after the 2009 season include the Capital One and Champs Sports (Orlando, Fla.), Outback (Tampa, Fla.), Alamo (San Antonio) and Motor City (Detroit). The Big Ten’s champion automatically qualifies for the Bowl Championship Series, which includes the Rose Bowl. The league’s runner-up — if it does not qualify for a second BCS bowl — is designated for the Capital One Bowl. The Outback Bowl receives the third team, followed by either the Alamo Bowl or Champs Sports Bowl, then the Insight and Motor City bowls. Last year’s bowls totaled nearly $35 million in revenue for league schools.

The Big Ten last renegotiated bowl contracts in 2005 when it added the Champs and Insight bowls and dropped the Music City (Nashville, Tenn.) and Sun (El Paso, Texas) from its bowl lineup. Delany said at the time the league wanted to add destinations that cater to alumni, many of whom live in Arizona and Florida.

“I have to say we love our alignment,” Delany said. “It’s been good to us. We’ve adjusted from time to time, and even when we’ve adjusted in the past it’s always difficult.

“We never really had a bad bowl relationship. It’s just whether or not find better ones, whether you can improve your lot.”

The Big Ten became one of the first leagues to secure a tie-in for a non-champion when it sent its runner-up to the Holiday Bowl in 1986. The league ended that agreement in 1994, the same year it secured Capital One and Outback bowl agreements. The league began its relationship with the Alamo Bowl one year later.

The league’s contract with the Capital One Bowl earns the league nearly $4.25 million, the top payout among non-BCS bowl games. But Orlando’s 73-year-old stadium’s potential $175 million renovation has stalled, according to the Orlando Sentinel.  The paper reports a slowdown in tourism taxes have placed the project on that community’s back shelf for possibly 10 more years. The Champs Bowl also is played at the same stadium.

“The first thing the commissioners told me was ‘I thought you guys had approved renovation of the stadium. I don’t think you guys realize how important this is for us,'” Florida Citrus Sports chief executive officer Steve Hogan told the paper. ” … I didn’t expect to be shocked as I was about how pointed and concerned our existing sponsors are right now.”

 “We’ve been watching it for a long time,” Delany said. “We’ve been encouraging the city, the bowl, the Florida Citrus Association just to make progress, to move forward, because anybody that follows the college game, whether it’s in urban areas or on campus, facilities have been improving over the last 10, 15, 20 years. We’ve been encouraging that. That will be a factor. How big a factor? It’s to be determined.”

Read the rest of this entry »


Olsen, Brodell look for an NFL shot

April 24, 2009
Iowa offensive lineman Seth Olsen talks to reporters during Iowa's annual football media day, Aug. 4, 2008, in Iowa City, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Iowa offensive lineman Seth Olsen talks to reporters during Iowa's annual football media day, Aug. 4, 2008, in Iowa City, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

IOWA CITY — Dan Shonka describes former Iowa guard Seth Olsen as a finished product.

That doesn’t mean Olsen, 23, is ready to pound the likes of NFL defensive tackle Albert Haynesworth anytime soon. But Olsen can step into just about any offensive scheme and understand what the offensive line coach is talking about.

“Olsen can put his hat on you,” said Shonka, general manager and national scout for Ourlads Scouting Services, LLC. “He can block in the zone-blocking scheme, he can run his feet into you, he’s smart, he’s aggressive, he does a lot of good things.”

“We like him, he’s liked by a lot of offensive line coaches. He’s definitely a guy with ability to block in zone schemes, he’s valued for that and his understanding of zone blocking schemes.”

Shonka ranks Olsen (6 feet, 4 1/2 inches, 306 pounds) as the 11th-best guard in this draft. Shonka said has got “pretty good first-step quickness” but “he could use a little more body strength.” Shonka projects Olsen as a fifth-round pick going to Indianapolis.

Olsen was voted a first-team all-Big Ten offensive lineman by both the league’s coaches and media outlets. He was named to four different All-American squads, including first-team by Rivals.com.

Former Iowa wide receiver Andy Brodell (6-3, 200) also is vying to make an NFL club. Shonka said Brodell reminds him of former Iowa receiver Kevin Kasper, who covered and returned kicks for several different NFL teams.

“If (Brodell) could go down and make tackles on special teams, coverage teams and be your fourth or fifth receiver, he’ll have a shot at making a ballclub,” Shonka said. “A lot of times you can’t find that third, fourth or fifth receiver that can make a tackle on a special team.”

Brodell’s top performance came in the 2006 Alamo Bowl, where he caught six passes for 159 yards and two touchdowns. But in 2007, he suffered a torn hamstring against Wisconsin and missed the final eight games.

Brodell totaled 961 yards last year. He caught 36 passes for 533 yards and four touchdowns. He was named the Big Ten Special Teams Player of the Week after an 81-yard punt return for a touchdown clinched Iowa’s 17-5 win against Iowa State.


Combine snub motivates Kroul toward NFL

April 21, 2009
Iowa defensive lineman Matt Kroul carries the Heartland Trophy off the field after the Hawkeyes' win over Wisconsin at Kinnick Stadium on Oct. 18, 2008, in Iowa City. Iowa won 38-16. Iowa won, 38-16. (Jim Slosiarek/The Gazette)

Iowa defensive lineman Matt Kroul carries the Heartland Trophy off the field after the Hawkeyes' win over Wisconsin at Kinnick Stadium on Oct. 18, 2008, in Iowa City. Iowa won 38-16. Iowa won, 38-16. (Jim Slosiarek/The Gazette)

IOWA CITY — It’s hard to overlook Matt Kroul’s impact to the Iowa football program.

The Mount Vernon native started a school-record 50 straight games. That’s every game for Iowa’s last four seasons, including three bowls. He has an award roll in Iowa’s spring prospectus that includes the Big Ten Conference Sportsmanship Award, permanent team captain status and second-team all-Big Ten honors by the league’s media outlets.

However, lost in his long list of accolades, was his name from the NFL Combine in February.

“After some of the stuff I had done, it was disappointing,” Kroul said. “But at the same time, it opened my eyes to keep working, and keep on … I figure, hopefully, for the next few years of my life to just keep competing every day, I took it heart, too, I guess.”

Kroul thought about the slight when he met with Iowa strength coach Chris Doyle. Getting left out stung Kroul.

“I used it as motivation and make the most of things on my pro day,” Kroul said. “Hopefully I put good enough numbers up there that there’s more interest.

“Yeah, it hurt a little bit, but at the same time, you just kind of roll with things and go on.”

Kroul, 23, finished his Iowa career with 238 tackles, 19.5 tackles for loss and seven sacks. He’s forever linked with fellow defensive tackle Mitch King, with whom he paired in the starting lineup for 45 games. Iowa Coach Kirk Ferentz often references “King and Kroul” when talking about leadership and work ethic, whether it’s in a spring practice or a game.

“From my vantage point, he’s a guy that’s going to make someone’s team better and help them win football games,” Ferentz said.

“I’ve had several people say they were really impressed with him,” Ferentz said. “It’s going to be him finding the right spot, right place, right time.”

Dan Shonka, general manager and national scout for Ourlads Scouting Services, LLC., graded Kroul as a seventh-round pick despite Kroul not receiving a combine invitation. Shonka said Kroul has several intangibles teams are looking for, including his physical skills.

“He’s an excellent technique player,” Shonka said. “He can run those guards back; he can drive them back,. He uses his hands really well, he keeps a low pad level, he’s instinctive. …”

“If you study Iowa’s tapes, he’s one of those guys that’s always in the picture frame, He’s always around the ball. I think that he does so many good things.”

Kroul has improved his stature with a strong showing at Iowa’s pro day in March. He’s up to 291 pounds and stands nearly 6 feet, 1.5 inches. He ran the 40-yard dash in 4.99 seconds and bench pressed 225 pounds 22 times.

“If Matt Kroul gets signed as a free agent, he’s going to be a steal for somebody,” Shonka said. “Because, again, there’s not a lot of true 4-3 tackles out there because there’s so many of the nose tackle types. Matt would fit right in that 4-3 scheme.”

The Sporting News listed Kroul as a priority free agent for teams. The magazine touted Kroul as a punishing tackler who “wants to be in on every play … a hard-nosed player who shows intelligence and toughness.” The magazine’s assessment of Kroul is “he’s limited at the next level, (but) he’ll make it tough for a team to cut him.”

Iowa defensive tackle Matt Kroul takes down Michigan State quarterback Brian Hoyer during the fourth quarter at Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City, Iowa, on Oct. 27, 2007. (JONATHAN D. WOODS/THE GAZETTE)

Iowa defensive tackle Matt Kroul takes down Michigan State quarterback Brian Hoyer during the fourth quarter at Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City, Iowa, on Oct. 27, 2007. (JONATHAN D. WOODS/THE GAZETTE)

Kroul has heard from several teams interested in either drafting him or signing him to a free-agent contract after the draft. Kroul is confident he’ll get a chance to play in the NFL either way.

“I don’t want to be arrogant or anything, but I’ve done enough the last four years that I should be able to compete with these guys,” Kroul said. “It’s definitely going to be enjoyable. I’ll be looking forward to doing that.”

This weekend, Kroul plans to enjoy the time with his family when he shifts from college to pro player. His thoughts range from “stressful” to “exciting” to “satisfying” when thinking about his journey from Mount Vernon all-stater to Iowa four-year starter to the NFL. He also said the gathering won’t be “too flamboyant.”

“All it takes is one team,” he said.


Iowa basketball’s best/worst moments: Nos. 8 and 7

March 16, 2009

Iowa’s men’s basketball team finished 15-17 and 5-13 in the Big Ten. In a long season, there are always highlights and not-so memorable moments, particularly in a season that featured a little of both.

Over the upcoming week, I’ll rank the top and worst moments of the season — two every day. Here are the N0. 8 and 7 best and worst moments of the 2008-09 men’s basketball season.

No. 8 Best: Emergence of Freshman Matt Gatens

Iowa's Matt Gatens (5) fights for a loose ball with Northwestern's Kevin Coble during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game, Feb. 7, 2009, in Iowa City, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Iowa's Matt Gatens (5) fights for a loose ball with Northwestern's Kevin Coble during the first half, Feb. 7, 2009, in Iowa City. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

We all knew Gatens would be a Hawkeye and a key contributor to the basketball team once  he stepped in Carver-Hawkeye Arena. However his accomplishments exceeded most of the expectations for this 6-foot-6 freshman from Iowa City High.

Gatens led the Big Ten in free-throw percentage (90.4 percent) and ranked among the league leaders in 3-point percentage. He led all Big Ten freshmen in minutes played and was second in scoring at 11.1 points (just behind Ohio State’s William Buford). He was named to the Big Ten’s all-freshman team and finished just behind Buford for the Big Ten’s freshman of the year award (I, for one, voted for Gatens).

Gatens also led Iowa in minutes played with 34.1 and 1,056 total minutes, nearly 100 minutes more than Jake Kelly. He finished second on the team in scoring and hit a team-high 52 3-pointers. He also provided backbone and aggressive play, a recipe for future leadership.

Michigan guard David Merritt, bottom, contests for the ball with Iowa guard Devan Bawinkel, top, in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2009, in Ann Arbor, Mich. Michigan won 64-49. (AP Photo/Tony Ding)

Michigan guard David Merritt, bottom, contests for the ball with Iowa guard Devan Bawinkel, top, in the second half , Jan. 11, 2009, in Ann Arbor, Mich. Michigan won 64-49. (AP Photo/Tony Ding)

No. 8 Worst: Michigan manhandles Iowa, Jan. 11

Iowa was beaten in every way by Michigan  with the 64-49 score hardly

showing the Wolverines’ complete domination. Iowa failed to keep Michigan off the offensive glass, identify shooters and got caught repeatedly on defensive switches where a guard was dwarfed in the post. 

 Players duplicated positions in setting screens and couldn’t find the open shooter. Often players looked tentative, passing up open shots. Several times the shot clock dwindled inside of five seconds only to have an Iowa player throw up a weak shot at the end of the possession.

“I just don’t think we’re comfortable out there,” Iowa sophomore guard Jake Kelly said after the game. “We want to use the shot clock and move it around and work it, but then again, I think we need to take open shots.

“In this league you’re not going to get two open opportunities. You get your first one and if you pass that up, you’re probably going to have to go with panic mode.”  

No. 7 Best: Iowa halts Wisconsin in OT

Iowa's Aaron Fuller (24) blocks a shot by Wisconsin's Jordan Taylor (11) during the second half of their Big Ten Conference basketball game Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2009 at Carver-Hawkeye Arena in Iowa City. The Wisconsin bench was called for a technical foul after the play.(Brian Ray/The Gazette)

Iowa's Aaron Fuller (24) blocks a shot by Wisconsin's Jordan Taylor (11) during the second half, Jan. 21, 2009 at Carver-Hawkeye Arena. Wisconsin Coach Bo Ryan was called for a technical foul after the play. (Brian Ray/The Gazette)

Iowa showed its guts against Wisconsin, the first of three overtime victories for the Hawkeyes this season. After watching a five-point lead disintegrate in the final 26 seconds of regulation, Iowa’s players rebounded with tenacity in overtime to beat Wisconsin at Carver-Hawkeye Arena and end a three-game losing streak.

Iowa freshman Aaron Fuller completed the game’s most important play and maybe the best individual play of the season with 2:51 left in regulation. Wisconsin’s Jordan Taylor stole a pass and appeared to go for an easy layup. Fuller blocked the ball at the last second and both players were sent flying past the basket. No foul was called, and Wisconsin Coach Bo Ryan ran to mid-court protesting. Ryan was hit with a technical foul, and Peterson drilled four consecutive free throws as a result to give Iowa a 51-49 lead.

“I just tried to hustle back as hard as I can because every possession meant a lot, and those two points could have meant the difference in us winning and us losing,” he said. “I just got back as fast as I could and jumped up and hoped they didn’t call a foul. For a second I thought they were going to call a foul, but they didn’t, and we got the ball back. I felt that was kind of a big play.”

No. 7 Worst: 17-point loss at Wisconsin, Peterson out with hamstring injury

Iowa's Jeff Peterson, left, and Wisconsin's Joe Krabbenhoft go after a loose ball during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2009, in Madison, Wis. (AP Photo/Andy Manis)

Iowa's Jeff Peterson, left, and Wisconsin's Joe Krabbenhoft go after a loose ball during the first half Feb. 11, 2009, in Madison, Wis. (AP Photo/Andy Manis)

Cyrus Tate didn’t play. Matt Gatens was slapped with a technical. Point point guard Jeff Peterson pulled his right hamstring.

Oh, and the Badgers murdered Iowa 69-52 in every possible way.

Peterson had started all 25 games up to this point, but pulled his right hamstring with about 9 minutes, 30 seconds left in the game.

Iowa had 14 turnovers and couldn’t match the Badgers’ size or quickness.

“Any time you lose a basketball game it is frustrating,” Gatens said. “To have a good game against Northwestern on Saturday and come in here and not play our best isn’t what we had planned and doesn’t really feel good.”

COMING WEDNESDAY:  The Nos. 6 and 5 best and worst moments for the Iowa men’s basketball team.


Happy Anniversary, Iowa men’s basketball

March 15, 2009
Iowa's Glen Worley celebrates a good play as Creighton's Alan Huss walks away during their first round NCAA tournament game Thursday, March 15, 2001, in Uniondale, N.Y. Iowa won 69-56. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Iowa's Glen Worley celebrates a good play as Creighton's Alan Huss walks away during their first round NCAA tournament game Thursday, March 15, 2001, in Uniondale, N.Y. Iowa won 69-56. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Eight years ago today, Iowa men dispatched Creighton 69-56 in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. It was the last time Iowa has won an NCAA Tournament game.

There are second-graders in this state who’ve never seen Iowa win an NCAA Tournament game. My daughter, for one, who was born March 16, 2001. The national milestones since that victory — Iraq War, first African-American president, economy headed for the next Great Depression — really toss dust on this statistic.

The sinking feeling grows into an ulcer for the basketball program is to look across the street. Iowa’s football program, led by Kirk Ferentz, has played in FIVE New Year’s Day bowls since the basketball program’s last NCAA Tournament win. Ferentz has led Iowa to bowls in seven of the last eight seasons since Iowa’s tournament win.

Since beating Creighton, Iowa has lost three NCAA tournament games. Kentucky beat Iowa in the 2001 second round 92-79. Iowa then lost to Cincinnati 76-64 in 2005 and suffered the big-time upset loss to No. 14 seed Northwestern State 64-63 in 2006.

This week I’ll count down the 10 best and worst moments of the 2008-09 men’s basketball season. Each day we’ll also include an aspect of this past season and look ahead to 2009-2010. I invite your comments as well. We’ll begin Monday with Nos. 10 and 9.

TODAY: THE SCHEDULE

Iowa’s 2008-09 non-conference schedule featured lots of frequent-flyer miles. Iowa played West Virginia and Kansas State in Las Vegas, at Boston College for the ACC-Big Ten Challenge and at The Citadel (seriously) in Charleston, S.C. Iowa beat The Citadel (a 20-win team, by the way) going away, nipped K-State at the buzzer, lost with no time remaining at BC and was blown out against West Virginia. All of the teams were decent, Iowa went 2-2 so overall that was a push.

In-state, Iowa rolled Northern Iowa and Iowa State at home and was bombed by Drake in Des Moines. Iowa handled all other home non-conference scheduling with little problem.

Next fall, Iowa won’t leave the Midwest. The Hawkeyes will participate in Kansas City’s Guardians Classic on Nov. 23-24 at the new Sprint Center. The road games are Northern Iowa and Iowa State, while Drake comes to Iowa City. The Big Ten-ACC Challenge (we’ll flip it for location) comes to Iowa City. That’s a much lighter load for the players and the budget.


My final Big Ten ballot

March 8, 2009

In the past week I’ve changed my mind so many times about all-Big Ten selections it has prompted a call from the Big Ten Conference. There’s about 30 players worthy of consideration for all-Big Ten honors. There’s also about eight players with whom I’d have no problem earning first-team honors.

With that in mind, and after a few preliminary ballots, here’s how I voted for the all-Big Ten teams and honor awards that will be released by the Big Ten Network on Monday.

FIRST TEAM

Kalin Lucas, Michigan State; Evan Turner, Ohio State; Talor Battle, Penn State; Manny Harris, Michigan; Mike Davis, Illinois

SECOND TEAM

Robbie Hummel, Purdue; JaJuan Johnson, Purdue; Jake Kelly, Iowa; Jamelle Cornely, Penn State; DeShawn Sims, Michigan

THIRD TEAM

Kevin Coble, Northwestern; Craig Moore, Northwestern; Raymar Morgan, Michigan State; E’Twaun Moore, Purdue; Jason Bohannon, Wisconsin

COACH OF THE YEAR

1. Bruce Weber, Illinois; 2. Tom Izzo, Michigan State; 3. Ed DeChellis, Penn State

FRESHMAN OF THE YEAR

1. Matt Gatens, Iowa; 2. William Buford, Ohio State; 3. Delvon Roe, Michigan State

PLAYER OF THE YEAR

1. Talor Battle, Penn State; 2. Kalin Lucas, Michigan State; 3. Evan Turner, Ohio State

Voting for the all Big Ten team was difficult to say the least. Before voting, I compiled a list of 30 players, then condensed it into groupings. I considered about 12 players for first team, and two of the best players — Purdue’s Robbie Hummel and Michigan State’s Raymar Morgan — missed significant time with injury or illness. It wasn’t easy.

Wisconsin (no Marcus Landry or Joe Krabbenhoft, ouch), Illinois (no Chester Frazier, Demetri McCamey and Mike Tisdale hurts) and Minnesota (Lawrence Westbrook and Al Nolen) were difficult because they had so many players of similar ability. Purdue (Chris Kramer) and Michigan State (Goran Suton) had players that were tough omits. Penn State (Stanley Pringle) was a toughie.

My picks are guard-heavy, and I switched multiple times between Battle, Lucas and Turner for the league’s player of the year. Ultimately, I went with Battle because I think he can do more and means more for his team than the others. That’s not a slight to Lucas or Turner, however.

Coach of the year was the easiest. Weber’s team wasn’t expected to compete for the Big Ten title after a sub-par 2007-08 season. Izzo sometimes suffers unfairly because everyone expects Michigan State to be good. The No. 3 coach selection was tough between Penn State’s Ed DeChellis and Northwestern’s Bill Carmody.

I had Buford slightly ahead of Gatens for top freshman honors until the teams met last Tuesday. Although their stats are similar, one intangible remains etched in my mind: Gatens doesn’t play with Evan Turner.

Kelly was a late jump, but if anyone thinks I’m home-towning him to second team, think again. He’s scored 19 or more points in the last six games, took over at the point without starting there all year and defends against his opponent’s best offensive player. That’s tough for anyone, particularly for a player with a broken finger and several other ailments. Plus, since he’s taken over the point, Iowa has played its best basketball all season.


Iowa FB revenue comparisons with Iowa State, Notre Dame, Big Ten

March 1, 2009

Iowa ranks fifth among Big Ten schools in football revenue for the 2008 fiscal year (July 1, 2007 through June 30, 2008), according to figures supplied to the U.S. Department of Education.

These numbers differ slightly from those submitted to the NCAA, but most of the intangibles are the same. This list also includes football expenses for 2008 as well as recruiting expenses for men’s sports. The Education Department doesn’t supply specific recruiting expenses, but a good rule of thumb is that football recruiting expenses take up between 40 and 55 percent of all men’s recruiting expenses (except Notre Dame, which is much higher).

I also supplied a list of 10 other colleges to compare expenses from Big Ten schools with those of similar conferences and Notre Dame.

Ohio State
FB Revenue — $65,162,179
FB Expenses — $33,063,248
Men’s recruiting expenses — $794,284
 
Michigan
FB Revenue — $57,463,603
FB Expenses — $16,785,667
Men’s recruiting expenses — $929,383
 
Penn State
FB Revenue — $53,766,038
FB Expenses — $16,537,705
Men’s recruiting expenses — $534,741 
 
Michigan State
FB Revenue — $43,826,312
FB Expenses — $17,910,444
Men’s recruiting expenses — $744,715
 
Iowa
FB Revenue — $37,998,729
FB Expenses — $26,166,182
Men’s recruiting expenses — $637,685 
 
Wisconsin
FB Revenue — $37,733,698
FB Expenses — $22,979,031
Men’s recruiting expenses — $452,958
 
Illinois
FB Revenue — $25,370,427
FB Expenses — $12,210,666
Men’s recruiting expenses — $862,681
 
Minnesota
FB Revenue — $24,275,876
FB Expenses — $9,306,397
Men’s recruiting expenses — $866,117
 
Indiana
FB Revenue — $21,774,074
FB Expenses — $12,493,144
Men’s recruiting expenses — $633,002
 
Purdue
FB Revenue — $21,641,794
FB Expenses — $14,501,436
Men’s recruiting expenses — $810,016 
 
Northwestern
FB Revenue — $21,080,405
FB Expenses — $12,113,946
Men’s recruiting expenses — $482,588
 
OTHERS
 
Georgia
FB Revenue — $67,053,051
FB Expenses — $19,073,103
Men’s recruiting expenses — $858,183
 
Notre Dame
FB Revenue — $59,774,851
FB Expenses — $16,589,924
Men’s recruiting expenses — $1,793,517
 
Alabama
FB Revenue — $57,370,617
FB Expenses — $16,154,793
Men’s recruiting expenses — $654,253 
 
Nebraska
FB Revenue — $49,076,861
FB Expenses — $18,797,860
Men’s recruiting expenses — $755,993
 
Washington 
FB Revenue — $37,092,611
FB Expenses — $17,202,549
Men’s recruiting expenses — $529,929 
 
Virginia
FB Revenue — $30,297,214
FB Expenses — $18,010,178
Men’s recruiting expenses — $569,738
 
Georgia Tech
FB Revenue — $29,353,239
FB Expenses — $14,199,958
Men’s recruiting expenses — $1,040,710
 
West Virginia
FB Revenue — $27,552,053
FB Expenses — $17,778,686
Men’s recruiting expenses — $1,066,916
 
Oregon
FB Revenue — $24,493,155
FB Expenses — $16,293,303
Men’s recruiting expenses — $903,462

Iowa State

FB Revenue — $17,404,826
FB Expenses — $9,833,299
Men’s recruiting expenses — $882,283

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