Big Ten does Iowa men no favors in league schedule

July 24, 2009

 

Iowa forward Aaron Fuller, center, battles to maintain control of the ball against Michigan forward Zack Gibson, left, and guard Zack Novak during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game at the Big Ten men's tournament Thursday, March 12, 2009 in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)

Iowa forward Aaron Fuller, center, battles to maintain control of the ball against Michigan forward Zack Gibson, left, and guard Zack Novak during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game at the Big Ten men's tournament Thursday, March 12, 2009 in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)

The Big Ten announced its single-play games for the 2009-10 men’s basketball schedule. Iowa plays at Wisconsin and hosts Penn State. It’s debatable whether any place is a good destination for the Iowa men’s basketball team after losing 11 straight road games. That tied a season record and is one road loss from tying the all-time school record.

So it’s easy to look at the Big Ten slate — the dates have not been announced — and shrug your shoulders. After all, Iowa’s last two league seasons have produced an 11-25 record, the worst two-year Big Ten record in school history. But it would have worked to Iowa’s favor had the league flipped the single plays with Iowa hosting Wisconsin this year and traveling to Penn State. Here’s why:

 Iowa has lost its last eight games at Wisconsin by an average of 10 points. Iowa has lost its last three at Penn State, but those losses have come by a combined seven points. Before the recent three-game losing streak, Iowa had won three straight at State College by an average of 15 points. With a young, inexperienced and recently unsuccessful team, the schedule could have provided that break for Iowa. It did not.

It’s not like Iowa has many other reprieves on its Big Ten road schedule, either. Here’s a look at Iowa’s recent history at Big Ten venues:

  • At Illinois: Lost 8 straight and 19 of 20
  • At Indiana: Lost 3 straight and 7 of 9
  • At Michigan: Lost 1 but won 3 of 4
  • At Michigan State: Lost 14 straight
  • At Minnesota: Lost 1 and 3 of 4
  • At Northwestern: Lost 4 of 5
  • At Ohio State: Lost 4 straight
  • At Purdue: Lost 3 of 4
  • At Penn State: Lost 3 straight (does not play in State College this winter)
  • At Wisconsin: Lost last 8

The in-state schools are no picnic, either. Iowa plays at both Northern Iowa and Iowa State this year, while hosting Drake. Here’s the recent trend involving Iowa and its in-state rivals:

  • At Iowa State: Lost 3 straight
  • At Northern Iowa: Lost 3 of 4
  • At Drake: Lost 2 straight, but won 13 previous games (Iowa hosts Drake this year)

Iowa also plays in Kansas City’s CBE Classic (formerly known as the Guardians Classic) this fall. The opening round games at Carver-Hawkeye Arena include Duquesne and Illinois-Chicago. Iowa owns a 2-1 record against Duquesne, but never has played Illinois-Chicago. Iowa then will play two games against either Pittsburgh, Texas or Wichita State at Kansas City. Pittsburgh was ranked No. 1 for three weeks last year, while Texas also qualified for the NCAA Tournament. Wichita State played in the postseason College Basketball Invitational. Iowa last played Pittsburgh in 1997, and Wichita State in 1981 (the heartbreaking NCAA tournament loss). Iowa played Texas in the Guardians Classic in 2006.

 As for the Big Ten, here’s a look at all of the single-play match-ups. It’s nice to see Michigan State and Purdue play twice this year, because they easily are the top Big Ten teams returning this year. But it’s also strange for Wisconsin, which has its single plays againsts Iowa and Minnesota. Those three teams are considered priority rivalries in Big Ten football and must play annually.

  • ILLINOIS | Minnesota, at Michigan
  • INDIANA | Michigan State, at Penn State
  • IOWA | Penn State, at Wisconsin
  • MICHIGAN | Illinois, at Purdue
  • MICHIGAN STATE | Ohio State, at Indiana
  • MINNESOTA | Wisconsin, at Illinois
  • NORTHWESTERN | Purdue, at Ohio State
  • OHIO STATE | Northwestern, at Michigan State
  • PENN STATE | Indiana, at Iowa
  • PURDUE | Michigan, at Northwestern
  • WISCONSIN | Iowa, at Minnesota

Preliminary work underway at Carver

July 23, 2009

 

Workers from an Iowa City tree service clear trees from the northwest side of Carver-Hawkeye Arena on Thursday, July 23, 2009. The work is done to complete a utility project necessary to begin a the renovation of Carver-Hawkeye Arena. (Scott Dochterman/The Gazette)

Workers from an Iowa City tree service clear trees from the northwest side of Carver-Hawkeye Arena on Thursday, July 23, 2009. The work is done to complete a utility project necessary to begin a the renovation of Carver-Hawkeye Arena. (Scott Dochterman/The Gazette)

Utility crews have begun preparatory work on the invisible guts of Carver-Hawkeye Arena’s future renovation.

The $2 million utility project has wiped out half the parking west of Carver-Hawkeye Arena, which senior associate athletics director Jane Meyer promises will be available in time for football season. The project includes water and electrical work, and a local tree service was clearing timber northwest of the arena.

“We have to get a 12-inch water line from Hawkins Drive down around sort of the footprint of where the practice facility will be,” Meyer said. “This was bid as a separate project.

“The utilities have to be out of the way before anything else begins.”

The state Board of Regents approved the $47 million renovation in June 2008. Athletics officials planned to break ground this fall, but Meyer said it’s too early to commit to a timeline because the drawings are not finalized. Iowa City’s Neumann Monson Architects and Kansas City-based HNTB are the project architects.

“I’m not even going to speak to that (a timeline) until we know where this last pricing comes in and we make sure everything is in order,” Meyer said.

Earlier this week Athletics Director Gary Barta said the utility project will lead to Carver’s renovation.

“The actual Carver project hasn’t gone to bid yet,” he said. “It’s a precursor. It’s a utility project that will allow us to do the big renovation once we go to bid sometime this fall.”

Athletics officials have received around $9 million in pledges and commitments for the project as of earlier this summer. They hope to raise $20 million privately. Associate athletics director Mark Jennings said Thursday the fundraising campaign is ahead of schedule.

The basketball facility/arena renovation includes a multi-court gym for the basketball and volleyball teams and a renovated wrestling complex. Each sport will receive new locker rooms, new coaches offices and an 8,000-square foot strength and conditioning center.

The arena renovation plan includes two hospitality rooms and 650 premium seats for men’s basketball. A courtside seat for men’s basketball is valued at $125,000 in giving over five years. A second-row seat costs $60,000 over five years. There will be 50 seats in each row. The arena also includes 550 premium club seats costing $12,500 per seat over five years.


Peer pressure leading recruits to Iowa

July 18, 2009
Southfield-Lathrup (Mich.) High School's Roy Marble Jr., during practice on Friday, January 11, 2008.  (Photo by DAVID KILKENNEY/Special to The Free Press)

Southfield-Lathrup (Mich.) High School's Roy Marble Jr., during practice on Friday, January 11, 2008. (Photo by DAVID KILKENNEY/Special to The Free Press)

Most people believe peer pressure for teenagers involves only their friends. That’s not necessarily accurate, especially when it comes to sports recruiting.

College sports teams — especially in basketball — have only a few select scholarships open each year. Once they’re gone, those scholarships aren’t coming back.

Iowa had four open scholarships for 2010. In fall 2008, Sioux Falls (S.D.) Roosevelt forward Cody Larson committed to Iowa. Shortly thereafter, Chanse Creekmur from Marshalltown committed (and later decommitted).

In March, when four Iowa players left the program, Iowa suddenly had four available scholarships for the 2010 season. One, obviously, is on hold for Larson. But within the last month, Iowa secured three commitments while somewhat playing those recruits against others.

Mundelein (Ill.) guard Ben Brust was the first to jump on board, picked Iowa over Northwestern and Butler on July 1. Then, in stunning fashion, Iowa nabbed Detroit’s Roy Marble Jr., son of the school’s all-time leading scorer Roy Marble, one day later. Marble, who had several offers from mid-majors and had looks from Michigan and Michigan State, was interested in other schools but was comfortable with Iowa. He didn’t want to risk losing a scholarship to play the scholarship waiting game elsewhere.

“I committed early because kids are starting to commit early,” he said. “Because I had some idea I wanted to be a Hawk, I didn’t want them to take my scholarship and give it to somebody else.”

McCabe became a summer camp superstar, receiving scholarship offers from Minnesota, Arizona State, Utah, Northwestern and other schools in the region. He received an offer from Iowa in March but wanted to wait almost to validate his commitment. He knew Iowa had only one scholarship left for his class, and he couldn’t leave the coaches hanging forever.

“I think for me it was kind of nerve wracking for a little while,” he said. “But I was excited when Iowa got Ben Brust and Roy Marble Jr. I played against Ben Brust in a tournament in Chicago. He’s a very good guard. Of course I know about Cody Larson. He’s very athletic. I’m just excited just knowing those other players are coming in.”

All of Iowa’s 2010 recruits also received boosts from people connected with the Iowa program. Marble Jr.’s dad is the only player to score more than 2,000 for Iowa.McCabe’s former high school teammate, Brennan Cougill, will be a freshman this fall at Iowa. Brust is good friends with Cully Payne, who also is an incoming freshman. Larson grew up in the same town as Wisconsin’s Joe Krabbenhoft, who told Larson that Iowa’s program was headed in the right direction.

Iowa could have other scholarships open up in 2010, if someone leaves the team early. Here’s a look at Iowa’s class of 2010 and their numbers last year.

Roy Marble Jr., a 6-foot-5 guard/forward from Detroit, averaged 22 points, nine rebounds and 4.5 assists

Zach McCabe, a 6-foot-6 forward, averaged 16.1 points, nine rebounds and 5.3 assists for Class 3A state champion Sioux City Heelan

Cody Larson, a 6-foot-8 forward/post, averaged 17.8 points, 9.4 rebounds and 2.8 assists for Sioux Falls Roosevelt. He had offseason knee surgery

Ben Brust, a 6-foot-2 guard, averaged 28 points a game for Mundelein (Ill.) High School until breaking his leg midway through the season


Zach McCabe tabs Iowa, touts ‘physical’ play

July 17, 2009
Sioux City Heelan's Zach McCabe dunks the ball in his team's victory over Carroll in a Class 3A semifinal game at the Iowa boys high school basketball tournament,  Thursday, March 12, 2009, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Steve Pope)

Sioux City Heelan's Zach McCabe dunks the ball in his team's victory over Carroll in a Class 3A semifinal game at the Iowa boys high school basketball tournament, Thursday, March 12, 2009, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Steve Pope)

Sioux City Heelan senior Zach McCabe sifted through numerous basketball scholarship offers but only one tugged at his heart.

McCabe, a 6-foot-6 forward, picked Iowa over Arizona State, Virginia, Utah, Minnesota and Northwestern among others. McCabe said his choice came down to one simple, yet special factor.

“I’ve been a Hawkeye fan ever since I was a little kid,” McCabe said Friday. “Playing there has always been a dream of mine. For me I wanted to stay close to home and instate and help Iowa be winners.”

McCabe is the fourth and final high school commitment for the 2010 class. He joins guards Roy Marble Jr. of Detroit and Ben Brust of Mundelein, Ill., and forward Cody Larson of South Falls (S.D.) Roosevelt as future Iowa players.

McCabe averaged 16.1 points and nine rebounds a game for the Class 3A state champion Crusaders. He led the team in assists with 144 and sank 50.3 percent of his shots. He was a teammate of incoming Iowa freshman Brennan Cougill.

“They’re going to get somebody who’s both blue collar and white collar,” Heelan Coach Tom Betz said. “He’s not afraid to do the dirty work. He’s a competitor.

“He’s as competitive of a kid we’ve ever had and a very skilled kid. He shoots the ball extremely well and plays both ends of the court.”

McCabe also plays quarterback for Heelan’s football team and garnered a few football scholarship offers. He said his passion lies with basketball, which made his college sport an easy choice. But his on-court basketball mentality mirrors his football mindset.

“I’m a very tough player, pretty physical,” McCabe said. “For me, I can score and rebound. I pretty much do anything the coaches ask me to do.”

Iowa coaches offered McCabe a scholarship earlier this year, but McCabe wanted to take his time to validate his choice. He played in a summer AAU tournament in Milwaukee last week and talked with his family about the new offers he had received.

“I told them I love Iowa a lot, and that’s where I wanted to go,” he said. “They (family members) would have been happy with anywhere I would have went. But they’re Hawkeye fans.”


Analysis of Iowa’s new basketball players, PTL videos

July 14, 2009

                                                                              

I’m getting a pretty good feel for Iowa’s new players and how they will contribute in the upcoming season. At the end of the Prime Time League this month, I will write a full analysis of how Iowa basketball shapes up entering the 2009-2010 season. But here’s a look at the newcomers and how I think they can contribute for Iowa.

Iowa coaches will expect only one of the four new players to start, while the other three will contribute in different roles. Freshman Cully Payne will start at the point. Freshman Brennan Cougill will see significant time in the post. Freshman Eric May will play in spurts but his time will be determined by real practice and the non-conference schedule in November. Junior Devon Archie will split time at power forward.

Imprinted Sportswear/Goodfellow Printing's Cully Payne (3) brings the ball down the court during the team's game against Mike Gatens Real Estate/McCurrys on the opening night of the Prime Time League, June 15, 2009 at the North Liberty Community Center.  (Brian Ray/The Gazette)

Imprinted Sportswear/Goodfellow Printing's Cully Payne (3) brings the ball down the court during the team's game against Mike Gatens Real Estate/McCurrys on the opening night of the Prime Time League, June 15, 2009 at the North Liberty Community Center. (Brian Ray/The Gazette)

Payne (6-foot) will start and run the show for Coach Todd Lickliter. He’s got plenty of talent, but he’s young and will make mistakes. He’s the first true point guard under Lickliter and demonstrates more interest in running an offense and getting the proper players into position than his predecessors. Payne can shoot fairly well and can drive at times, too. He has struggled in the PTL with more athletic defenders, like Kirkwood’s Kaylon Williams, and can be beaten off the ball by quicker ball-handlers. I’d say he’s a little more skilled at the point than Jeff Peterson but has a lot to prove to match Peterson’s toughness. It’s likely he’s in for a long season squaring off against Penn State’s Talor Battle, Michigan State’s Kalin Lucas and Michigan’s Manny Harris. He’ll do OK but he’ll take his lumps.

Mike Gatens Real Estate/McCurrys' Eric May (7) puts up a shot over Imprinted Sportswear/Goodfellow Printing's Eric Coleman (53) during their game July 6, 2009 at the North Liberty Community Center.  (Brian Ray/The Gazette)

Mike Gatens Real Estate/McCurrys' Eric May (7) puts up a shot over Imprinted Sportswear/Goodfellow Printing's Eric Coleman (53) during their game July 6, 2009 at the North Liberty Community Center. (Brian Ray/The Gazette)

May (6-5) is a tremendous athlete. He’s perhaps the most versatile player on the team. He can play inside and outside. He guards at least four positions and brings as much intensity as any player on the court. He’ll contribute by playing hard, but he doesn’t have a defined position right now. I look for May playing about 15 minutes a game rotating from shooting guard to power forward at times.

Cougill (6-10) will see about 40 percent of the action in the post as a back-up to Jarryd Cole. Cougill is a skilled passer and a good shooter. He has decent moves in the post and works hard. He struggles against more physical big men. His conditioning also is improving, but not a strength. The good thing about Cougill is he’s aware of his deficiencies and working on them daily. Right now he’s more of a finesse post player but in two years could be a real solid inside player.

Iowa forward Devon Archie takes the ball up strong against Iowa post Brennan Cougill during PrimeTime League action at the North Liberty Community Center on Monday, June 29, 2009. (Benjamin Roberts/Freelance)

Iowa forward Devon Archie takes the ball up strong against Iowa post Brennan Cougill during PrimeTime League action at the North Liberty Community Center on Monday, June 29, 2009. (Benjamin Roberts/Freelance)

Archie (6-9) is the most athletic player on the team. He’s sleek, can jump and has good moves to the basket. He’s a decent passer and makes good attempts to set screens, a bonus in Lickliter’s system. But Archie doesn’t play real physical and doesn’t appear to fight for position under the basket. He’s a different player than sophomore forward Aaron Fuller, which will make for a good combination at the position. Archie compares favorably with former Iowa player Kurt Looby.

Bottom line: These players will contribute this year but won’t save the world. They likely will supplement their teammates and fill the required roles. Payne, Cougill and May will help build a foundation for Iowa’s future, but like many freshmen, they will experience the lows before the highs.

Here are a couple of highlights from Monday’s Prime Time League:


PTL thoughts, July 6 (with video)

July 8, 2009
Imprinted Sportswear/Goodfellow Printing's Aaron Fuller (24) pulls up for a shot over Mike Gatens Real Estate/McCurry's Eric May (7) during their game on the opening night of the Prime Time league Monday, June 15, 2009 at the North Liberty Community Center.  (Brian Ray/The Gazette)

Imprinted Sportswear/Goodfellow Printing's Aaron Fuller (24) pulls up for a shot over Mike Gatens Real Estate/McCurry's Eric May (7) during their game on the opening night of the Prime Time league Monday, June 15, 2009 at the North Liberty Community Center. (Brian Ray/The Gazette)

I wrote about Eric May on Monday night, and he had a good performance. He scored 23 points, grabbed eight rebounds and dished seven assists. He also showed his versatility by defending point guard Cully Payne, shooting guard Devan Bawinkel and power forward Aaron Fuller.

I was most impressed with Fuller, who notched 27 points and grabbed 13 rebounds. He’s stronger and more physical in the paint than last year. He also can shoot from the outside, hitting two three-pointers. Payne was up-and-down, scoring 22 points with eight assists. Bawinkel hit 4-of-6 shots — all three-point attempts — for 12 points. His style of game doesn’t transition well to the up-and-down Prime Time League.

I spent only a few minutes at the other game, where Matt Gatens returned in solid fashion. He scored 32 points, grabbed six rebounds and directed his team to a 100-81 win. He told me afterward he felt fine just two weeks after an appendectomy.


Roy Marble Sr. ‘blown away’ by son’s decision

July 2, 2009
Roy Marble Jr. loosens up before a Southfield Lathrup (Mich.) High School basketball practice. (Detroit Free Press)

Roy Marble Jr. loosens up before a Southfield Lathrup (Mich.) High School basketball practice. (Detroit Free Press)

Roy Marble Sr. got the call Wednesday night, the one he didn’t expect but the one he always wanted.

His son, Roy Marble Jr., phoned to tell him his college choice. Roy Marble Jr., a senior at Southfield Lathrup (Mich.) High School, will follow his father at the University of Iowa.

“Man, words don’t even describe it,” Marble Sr. said Thursday. “We’re already close as it is. We probably talk more than we should sometimes. But to actually have him in front of me where I could actually pass on my knowledge in every area of growing up in college life and everything, God blessed me with a great kid.

“It’s like Christmas 10 times over.”

Roy Marble Sr. scored 2,116 points his career at Iowa from 1986-89. He’s the only player in Iowa history to score more than 1,800 points. He lives in Cedar Rapids and works as an analyst for the Big Ten Network and a consultant for Kirkwood Community College.

Roy Marble Jr. said he visits his father about three times a year. Marble Jr. said he and his father discussed his college choices but the younger Marble was able to make his own choice.

“He had his thoughts on it and stuff and helped with me the decision,” Roy Marble Jr. said. “I didn’t feel any pressure, though.”

Marble Sr. said he questioned his son about coming to Iowa during the recruiting process, primarily because of his own legacy. But his son stood up to him. Marble Sr. relented.

I laughed and said, ‘OK, you’re just like me. You’re going to take on the biggest challenge,’” Marble Sr. said.

Former Iowa basketball player Roy Marble drives to the basket in a 1986 game at Carver-Hawkeye Arena. Marble is Iowa's all-time leading scorer. His son, Roy Marble Jr., committed to Iowa on Thursday. (The Gazette)

Former Iowa basketball player Roy Marble drives to the basket in a 1986 game at Carver-Hawkeye Arena. Marble is Iowa's all-time leading scorer. His son, Roy Marble Jr., committed to Iowa on Thursday. (The Gazette)

But it wasn’t preordained that Marble Jr. would follow his father to Iowa. He attended an elite camp at the University of Michigan earlier this month. He visited Providence, liked Michigan, and had offers from Detroit and Dayton. But Marble Jr. was blown away by Iowa’s coaching staff. He’s Iowa’s third 2010 basketball commitment.

“I committed early because kids are starting to commit early,” he said. “Because I had some idea I wanted to be a Hawk, I didn’t want them to take my scholarship and give it to somebody else.

“I felt real comfortable when I came down here for a visit. I liked the environment.”

Marble Jr., a 6-foot-5 guard/forward, averaged 22 points, nine rebounds and 4.5 assists as a junior. He scored 28 points in a regional loss to a team featuring two Michigan State recruits. He’s confident in his abilities and what he can do for Iowa.

“I shoot the ball real well,” he said. “I attack the basket real well. I’m both a scorer and a slasher.”

Two weeks ago, both Marbles attended a Prime Time League game in North Liberty and received applause from the gym full of fans.

“They gave me a warm welcome and let me know how they feel about the situation,” Marble Jr. said. “It was cool.”

For Marble Sr., it’s nearly perfect. After losing his downtown businesses in the 2008 floods, he now has something exciting in his life.

“This is like my cash back in sort of thing,” he said. “This is bringing me some happiness in my life, rather than sitting around being sad. It takes my mind off of that. Now I can concentrate on being the best dad I can and get ready for some good old-fashioned Hawkeye basketball.”


Marble Jr. makes decision

July 2, 2009

According to both HawkeyeReport.com and HawkeyeNation.com, Roy Marble Jr. has committed to Iowa.

Marble Jr., son of Iowa’s all-time leading scorer Roy Marble, is the second 2010 commitment. Ben Brust of Mundelein, Ill., committed to Iowa on Wednesday.


Live blog today, video interview with Jarryd Cole

July 1, 2009
Mike Gatens Real Estate/McCurrys' Jordan Eglseder (UNI, 53, right) tries to get past LL Pelling Company/Iowa Ready Mix's Jarryd Cole (Iowa, 50, right) during their Prime Time League game on Wednesday at the North Liberty Recreation Center. Cole scored 32 points, including 20 in the first half. Eglseder finished with 24.

Mike Gatens Real Estate/McCurrys' Jordan Eglseder (UNI, 53, right) tries to get past LL Pelling Company/Iowa Ready Mix's Jarryd Cole (Iowa, 50, right) during their Prime Time League game on Wednesday at the North Liberty Recreation Center. Cole scored 32 points, including 20 in the first half. Eglseder finished with 24.

Mike Hlas, Marc Morehouse and I are live blogging from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. today about Iowa sports. That’s everything from football to hoops. Here’s the link:

Here are a few thoughts about last night’s Prime Time League action:

I’ve seen every player in the Prime Time League at least twice. So far, no player has impressed me quite like Jarryd Cole.

The Iowa junior has completely recovered from his knee injury as a freshman. He dominated UNI’s Jordan Eglseder in their head-to-head matchup on Wednesday. Cole scored 32 points, including 20 in the first half. He’s strong, intense and competitive. He’s also regained all explosiveness lost because of his left ACL tear two years ago. He’s also much quicker than most post players and tons better than he was last season.

Perhaps what impressed me the most after his last two games was how much Cole HATES to lose. He absolutely detests losing. Both games he sat by himself stewing after the game. He even tossed a remark to a couple of teammates about playing harder after the game.

Most PTL players compete like they would at the local YMCA. They play real hard on the court, then walk away like it’s a family game in the driveway. Not Cole. He’s everything Iowa needs right now from a leadership perspective.

Outside of Cole, I’d say I think Anthony Tucker has played well, and Eric May has impressed me with his strength and overall game.

In about a week, I’ll give my complete assessment of Iowa basketball right now, including the newer and veteran players. As you can imagine, Iowa basketball is a work in progress right now.


Ben Brust makes it official

July 1, 2009

Prep guard Ben Brust has chosen to play basketball at Iowa next year, he told me moments ago.

Brust chose Iowa over Northwestern, Stanford and Butler.

“It is official … I’m going to be Hawkeye,” Brust told me.

 

“I did all my homework, and I know this is what the right place,” he said. “It’s a great college town, the atmosphere … academically it’s what I’m looking for in a school.”

Brust, a 6-foot-2 incoming senior at Mundelein High School, averaged 28 points a game last year as a high school junior before breaking his leg. He said he’s completely healed from that injury.

Brust also is good friends with incoming Iowa freshman guard Cully Payne, who also is from the Chicago suburbs. Tuesday, the duo shot baskets at Carver-Hawkeye Arena, and Brust said that helped seal his decision. Brust also is excited about competing in the Big Ten.

“The Big Ten is a major plus,” he said. “The fact you go into all these places and compete against all these opponents, that’s I want to do.”

Brust joins Sioux Falls (S.D.) Roosevelt’s Cody Larson as Iowa’s 2010 commitments. Iowa has two scholarships available and have offered them to Sioux City Heelan’s Zach McCabe and Roy Marble Jr., son of Iowa’s all-time leading scorer Roy Marble.


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